ARC's 1st Law: As a "progressive" online discussion grows longer, the probability of a nefarious reference to Karl Rove approaches one

Monday, April 18, 2005

Adobe Systems gets Macromedia

Oh, Great.... Now when I want to view a PDF file, I'll be prompted to install 18 different apps instead of just adobe ones.

;-)

Adobe Systems Buys Macromedia In Stock Deal
Pact for $3.4 Billion to Create Software Giant, Set Stage For Possible Microsoft Battle
By DENNIS K. BERMAN and DAVID BANK
Staff Reporters of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
April 18, 2005; Page A1

Adobe Systems Inc. announced the acquisition of Macromedia Inc. for $3.4 billion in stock in a deal that will bring together the software of two companies with broad resources to distribute documents, video and other media to personal computers, cellphones and hand-held devices.

The transaction, part of the long-expected consolidation in the software industry, also could set the stage for an anticipated showdown with Microsoft Corp., of Redmond, Wash.
[...]
Adobe, founded in 1982, is the creator of Acrobat and the ubiquitous portable document format, or PDF, for electronic documents; its Adobe Reader software is installed on nearly every personal computer. Thirteen-year-old Macromedia has successfully carved a niche with its Flash and Shockwave software, used by artists and corporations alike to deliver video, animation and Web conferencing.

Bringing so much highly popular software together could strengthen Adobe in an anticipated battle with Microsoft. Besides having their respective software widely distributed in the PC market, each has also begun to penetrate the market for cellphones and hand-held devices. Separately they already had their software in more types of products than market leader Windows.

Microsoft already regards PDF's success as a long-term threat. The next version of Windows, code-named Longhorn and due out next year, is expected to include features to move documents around companies and the Internet, and aimed at eliminating the need for PDF.
Interesting that Microsoft is still playing defense against software designed in the '90s.

Subscription required for full-article, but well worth the price of admission.

Your Co-Conspirator,
ARC: St Wendeler